Friday, April 23, 2021

From cannibalism to self-harm: Documentary reveals extremes of faith

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As Christians around the world prepare to celebrate Jesus’ resurrection this Sunday (4), followers of other religions find other ways to express their belief. The documentary series À God’s Quest, which has its premiere this Friday (2), shows how the faithful can go to extremes in the search for a greater force.

“I don’t want to scare anyone, but in some sects within Hinduism, the corpses of the Ganges are eaten. They are shamanic practices, obviously very strong and intense”, explains filmmaker Jorge Said, responsible for the production of History, to the TV News.

“Also in Shi’ism [braço do islamismo] there are very hard practices to see. People strike each other with chains until they are, more than bloody, completely injured “, lists the director when asked about the most shocking things he witnessed on his trip around the world.

In the documentary, Said addresses the major religions on the planet and highlights both how they differ from each other and, at bottom, are more similar than many faithful would like to admit.

“When I was in the mountain area of ​​China, they invited me to enter a very poor home, and there was a small Buddhist, Taoist and shamanic shrine. I felt very comfortable. I come from a Christian tradition, and I realized that Buddhism accepts Christianity very well. I noticed something ecumenical in Christian churches in Jerusalem too “, Said philosophizes.

Christian faith is also covered in the series

Said also points out that, although he was shocked to see Shiites attacking themselves during a ritual, he sees similar events in Christianity, for example. “In Mexico and the Philippines, we have the crucifixion rites. A lot of religion has to do with this self-flagellation,” he points out.

The filmmaker behind Quest for Faith still points out that, although some people use their beliefs to start wars and kill, religion in its essence is bigger than that.

“What impacted me the most was the acceptance I had within religious communities. In Israel, Jewish communities embraced me and I was able to live in one of the four holy cities of Judaism in the north. I thought I would not be accepted because of my surname. [Said é um nome árabe, ligado ao islamismo], I had a lot of fear. I thought there might be some kind of conflict, but nothing happened. Nor with Hinduism “, he recalls.

“For me, it was something very precious, very beautiful. There were a lot of borders there. I think that’s why it impacted me so much. [mais do que os rituais chocantes de canibalismo e flagelação]. Realize that it is possible to cross all doors “, he speaks.

“It is very important nowadays to talk about unity, tolerance, and thus unite all spiritual movements. Because, in reality, this is what unites us the most”, he concludes.

In Search of God will have a special debut in History this Friday (2), at 8:40 pm, with two unpublished episodes. The series will be presented in full in History2 starting this Saturday (3), at 20h20. Check out the premiere commercial:

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