International Women’s Day: What is the use of increasing the representation of women in the legislatures where there are laws? – Women representatives need in Statutory bodies

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In which of these countries is the representation of women in the legislatures celebrated on International Women’s Day? What is the need to increase the representation of women in the actual legislatures? Let’s take a look.

Women representatives need in Statutory bodies: Half in the sky. Half of him. Such things are limited to mere slogans. In fact women are left with insecurity at every step. Acid attacks, dowry cases, kidnappings and rapes have become routine. There is a sense of insecurity throughout the gangs, husbands at home, male employees at work. The government has enacted a number of laws to protect women. But there is no proper representation of women in the legislature. Not only in India .. The situation is the same in most countries. If not we have unexpectedly laid a big platter for women in countries like Rwanda. It is not surprising that they have 63.8 per cent reservations in the legislature. But the fact is that. In which of these countries is the representation of women in the legislatures celebrated on International Women’s Day? What is the need to increase the representation of women in the actual legislatures? Let’s take a look.

Internationally, women’s representation in legislatures in various countries averages 22 percent. The average representation in our country is only 12 per cent. In a small country like Rwanda, 63.8 percent of seats in the legislature are reserved for women. In this sense this small country Rwanda looks much better than many big countries in the world. At the same time, the fact that India ranks 103rd in the average representation of women in the legislature is a matter of some concern. In this regard, our position in Asia is 13. The SAARC countries are ranked 5th while Hindustan is ranked 4th among the BRICS countries. Countries like Algeria, South Sudan and Libya are positioning women better than India. Women are also gaining significant representation in the legislature in Saudi Arabia and other Middle Eastern countries. Nepal, Afghanistan, Philippines, Singapore, Vietnam, China, Pakistan, Cambodia and Bangladesh are also in the forefront of women’s representation.

If women are not properly represented in the legislatures where many laws are drafted .. how honest is the law that is made for their protection and for their welfare? Where are the armory systems formed for their implementation? These questions have been asked many times by many women’s groups and well-known women. Many are of the opinion that laws such as the Domestic Violence Act, Equal Property Rights and Dowry Prohibition passed in our country’s legislatures have not been properly enforced over the years due to lack of integrity in design and enactment of laws without requiring enforcement systems.

In fact, Indian law does a lot for the protection and welfare of women. But statistics do not seem to indicate that law enforcement is limited. Special protection is also provided to women under Section ‌ 100 of the IPC. It is not wrong for a woman to attack a man in self-defense. Even if the man dies in that attack, it is not as if the woman has committed a crime. Section‌ 228-A – A woman who has been sexually assaulted should not give her name, photo or details in the media without permission. Section ‌ 354 – It is an offense to see, touch or gesture a woman’s body with sexual intent. Section‌ 376 – Case registration of sexual harassment of a woman who came for treatment. Section ‌ 509 – It is an offense to speak insultingly to women, to make gestures, or to display obscene objects. Section 4 294 – Women can be punished for up to 3 months if they walk on the road, wait at bus stops, sing obscene songs, make noise and cause trouble. Fellow employees in the workplace can file a complaint under the Harassment Act of 2013 if the boss disturbs office work and bothers for sexual contact.

The law provides for up to ten years in prison under Section 373 for bringing a girl under the age of 18 into prostitution. If a woman is sexually assaulted by a group of more than one person or by one member of a group, each person in the group becomes a criminal. Everyone is liable to punishment under Section 376-B of the IPC. Section 375 of the IPC provides for life imprisonment from seven years if found guilty of rape. There is a chance of 5 to 7 imprisonment under IPC 354 for insulting and assaulting a woman. IPC 496 provides for imprisonment for up to 7 years and a fine for men who cheat on women by pretending to be unmarried.

Killing a wife for dowry is punishable by up to seven years in prison and life imprisonment under Section 302B. Section 306 provides for imprisonment for up to ten years and a fine for inciting a woman to commit suicide by forcing or harassing her. Sections include imprisonment for up to seven years, fines, rape under Section 356, imprisonment for fines and kidnapping under Section 363 for imprisonment. Inducing a girl into prostitution is punishable by up to ten years in prison under Section 372. Rape is punishable by up to ten years in prison under Section 372. A second marriage with a wife is punishable by up to seven years in prison and a fine under Section 494. The law provides for a ten-year jail term under Section 495 for concealing a first marriage and remarrying a second.

Harassment of husband, aunt and uncle is punishable by up to three years imprisonment under Section 498A. Under the Dowry Prohibition Act, giving and taking dowry are considered two offenses. But filing to enforce this law is extremely rare. Insulting women is punishable by up to one year in prison under Section ‌ 509. Under Section 493, a person who commits adultery, has sex or cheats is liable to imprisonment for ten years and a fine.

Although it appears that many armistice laws have been enacted, the number of those convicted is very small compared to the number of those who commit such crimes. Many women’s union leaders and women lawyers are of the opinion that the reason for this is the flaws in the laws themselves. When making laws, the House addresses all issues on behalf of women and makes laws addressing the loopholes they raise. Then they are the ones who will definitely punish those who commit atrocities and crimes against women. If women are not properly represented in the legislature, they are of the opinion that there will be flaws in the laws that are designed to protect them. An example of this is the recent Fearless Act, which seeks to increase the representation of women in the legislature. This is evidenced by the fact that after the enactment of the Nirbhaya Act, even after the Pokso Act was drafted to make it more rigorous, many atrocities were committed against women.

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