Transatlantic unity – as important as ever

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“We do not want a confrontation with Russia, we do not want a reset policy, we cooperate with them when possible, but we always take steps when Russia threatens the interests of us or our partners in Ukraine, Georgia or anywhere else,” said Philip Reeker. Acting Assistant Secretary of State for European and Eurasian Affairs.

Reeker will soon resume his diplomatic duties in the UK. He emphasized the importance of transatlantic ties, and said that US President Joe Biden’s promise to improve and revitalize relations would be one of the best stages for both sides of the Atlantic to work together for democracy and to challenge the challenges of authoritarianism.

“President Biden has often said that no country, not even the most powerful one like the United States, be it military, economic, geographical, diplomatic or otherwise, will be able to meet some of the challenges we face today. We have to trust our partners. “In terms of security, economic prosperity – to rebuild our alliances and strength, especially after the Covid-Pandemic,” – said the diplomat.

We have a number of challenges, including the rise of China, Russia’s geopolitical influence, Britain’s exit from the EU, the rise of populism in several transatlantic countries, and much more. We understand that there may not be a consensus on solving all these problems, but it is an opportunity and a time to move forward;

“Transatlantic cooperation is more important now than ever before,” said Paula Dobryansky, vice president of the Atlantic Council’s Scowcroft Center, explaining that the world is now entering a new era of strategic competition. In this era, autocratic rivals Russia, China, and others are actively seeking to undermine the rule-based world order created by the United States and its allies after World War II.

Prolonged confrontation between democracies and autocracies, the effects of the coronavirus pandemic, the continued rapid spread of the virus in the face of growing global vaccination, the economic impact of the pandemic, and the dangers posed by harmful technology, nuclear weapons, non-democratic – World leaders facing a number of critical challenges say the key is to deepen cooperation, especially between countries such as the United States, Canada and European countries.

How can the Democratic Allies renew transatlantic cooperation? Paula Dobryansky says the new US president’s repeated emphasis on the importance of transatlantic ties at the G7, NATO, EU-US summits and elsewhere is crucial to deepening cooperation and empowering democracies with both authoritarian and social-economic authoritarianism. Dealing with health problems.

“President Biden ‘s participation in the G7, NATO and EU summits shows once again that the United States reaffirms its commitment to multilateral alliances. Britain emphasizes the importance of maintaining the transatlantic alliance after Brexit. Europe wants to join the global coalition. “It is a key player in transatlantic, multinational relations, and at the same time acts as a bridge in strategic cooperation with India and the Pacific countries, democratic partners,” Dobryansky said.

Patricia Penia, Director General of Foreign Policy at Canada International Relations, said that although differences of opinion on how to resolve this or that problem differ, cooperation between these countries is now critical and they should seize this opportunity:

“We have a number of challenges, including the rise of China, Russia’s geopolitical influence, Britain’s exit from the EU, the rise of populism in several transatlantic countries, and much more. We understand that there may not be a consensus on solving all these problems, but it is an opportunity and a time to move forward. President Biden’s recent approach to traditional, transatlantic partners has rekindled that enthusiasm. And it is clear that Canada, America and Europe should not miss this moment. We have a chance to lay the groundwork for this relationship. It is the strongest democratic unity in modern history and we can create a new international agenda, consolidate the world order. “Canada is fully committed to that goal,” Penia said.

Along with the US-Europe, Philip Reeker also talks about the importance of Canada’s involvement and explains that the cooperation of the world leaders, who share common values, is especially important now, when the authoritarian rivals, Russia and China, are not going to back down. “Transatlantic connections are the main way to deal with these problems,” he said.

Reeker explains that President Biden’s position on Russia was very clear from the beginning: the United States does not want to focus on conflicting issues, but neither does it want a “reset policy.” At the same time, the administration is pragmatically looking at the developments, renewing the “New Start” agreement, as it was a matter of mutual interest, talking about strategic stability and cyberspace.

However, “I think the president has taken a very pragmatic approach to some of Russia’s reckless and aggressive actions, be it a hacker attack on Solariunds, interference in our elections or something else.” He made it clear to Vladimir Putin by telephone, both in Geneva and in Geneva, that it is in our best interest to have a more constructive relationship, but we will respond to reckless actions and take action when Russia threatens the interests of us or our allies. “In Georgia or somewhere else,” said Philip Reeker.

According to him, hybrid threats and Russia’s violation of the sovereignty of neighboring countries are a matter of concern for the United States. All of this is part of a larger trend in which authoritarian regimes seek to undermine free, democratic societies and governments around the world. “This is a time when we need to unite with like-minded partners and revitalize democracy,” he said.

Foreign policy analysts also point to China’s growing challenge, saying the unity of the United States, Canada and Europe will be crucial in this regard as well. According to Reeker, the administration’s policy is clear, the United States will have a competitive relationship with China when it is needed, there will be cooperation when it is possible, and there will be confrontation where it “should be.” In his view, the US-Canada-Europe relationship with China could be the defining factor in the coming decades and perhaps even the entire 21st century foreign relations.

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