Sunday, March 7, 2021

Western VS Russia – who says what about the arrest of Nika Melia

Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest
WhatsApp
Telegram

Must Read

The world media is responding to the arrest of Nika Melia and the assault on the office of the “National Movement”. Western journalists write that the civil strife is escalating and Georgian democracy is in danger, and the most important thing for the Russian media is that Melia was the organizer of the “anti-Russian protest”. Partners grief and warnings VS story about the arrest of an anti-Russian accused. “Organizer of anti-Russian protests” Russian media has been actively covering the events in Georgia since the morning. “The leader of Saakashvili’s party has been arrested in Georgia,” the Russian edition RBC writes. Kremlin-funded RT (Russia Today) broadcasts the Kremlin narrative and reminds readers that it was during Saakashvili’s presidency in 2008 that “Georgia invaded South Ossetia.” Russia Today, a subsidiary of Sputnik, dedicates several reports on the events in Tbilisi. They did not steal the fact that Irakli Kobakhidze thanked the Minister of Internal Affairs for detaining Melia. RIA Novosti covered the critical assessment of the Public Defender of Georgia, but cut out Nino Lomjaria’s words from the middle of the sentence that February 23 is “the 100th anniversary of Georgia’s loss of independence and the Soviet Union.” Most of the Russian-language media outlets, when mentioning the reasons for Melia’s arrest, emphasize that the protest in the center of Tbilisi on the night of June 20, 2019 was not anti-occupation, but anti-Russian. These media outlets selectively convey the reasons for the protest. Gavrilov’s visit to the parliament is seldom mentioned, and even more seldom is the fact that he sat in the chair of the parliament. The interpretation of the events of June 20 is taken as a fact by the “Moscow Komsomolets”: “The criminal case against Melia was launched after the events of 2019. It is known as the “Gavrilov Crisis”. “Saakashvili’s supporters took advantage of the fact that a Russian parliamentarian, Sergei Gavrilov, accidentally took the floor during the event, and staged a mass riot to arrest the legislature.” The “arrest of the opposition leader” and the escalation of the controversy raise questions in the Western media about both the legitimacy of Nika Melia’s arrest and the measures taken during his detention. Authoritative publications remind readers that Nika Melia is the leader of the highest-ranking opposition party, and the political crisis in the country began after the government was accused of rigging the elections. The French “Le Parisien” highlights the violence used by the police during the assault and talks about Irakli Gharibashvili’s “opaque” biography and who could be the real ruler of the country. “The new Prime Minister is a very loyal supporter of Bidzina Ivanishvili, who is the founder of the Georgian Dream and the richest man in the country. “They suspect that he controls the country from behind the scenes,” the publication writes. The BBC calls the events in Tbilisi a “violent storm”. According to the media, hundreds of riot police were mobilized near the office of the “National Movement” and they used tear gas against Melia’s supporters. The BBC quotes the assessment of the British Ambassador to Georgia, Mark Clayton. “I am shocked by the scenes in the UNM office. Georgia needs violence and chaos in Tbilisi the least now. I urge all parties to exercise restraint today and in the days to come. ” The Washington Post also writes about the negative reaction of the diplomats. “Today, Georgia has stepped back on the path to stronger democracy in the family of Euro-Atlantic states,” the publication quoted an excerpt from a statement from the US Embassy in Georgia. The author writes that this is not the first time that the American side is concerned about the actions of the Georgian government. “Georgia, with a population of 3.7 million and bordering the Black Sea, was considered more democratic than its two neighbors and had ambitions to join NATO. But in recent years, US lawmakers have written letters to the Georgian leadership expressing concern that “some steps taken by the ruling Georgian Dream party have led to a democratic backlash.” However, the article predicts that the actions of the government will further aggravate the existing tensions in the country and indicate that the political crisis is a new trend in the countries bordering Russia. The British “Guardian” does not rule out the risk that “the political crisis may end in a bloody confrontation.” The article notes that this threat and “escalation have prompted Western countries to intervene, albeit formally – to call on the opposition and the government to remain calm.” Former diplomats also speak about the dangers. Former US Assistant Secretary of State for European and Eurasian Affairs Matthew Bryza told AFP that Melia’s arrest was a “reversal of democracy.” “Without more active involvement of the West, the situation could become very dangerous,” he said. .

Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest
WhatsApp
Telegram

Latest News

More Articles Like This

Western VS Russia - who says what about the arrest of Nika Melia